SAEM Award Winners

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  • John Marx Leadership Award

    SAEM seeks nominations for the John Marx Leadership Award. This award honors a SAEM member who has made exceptional contributions to emergency medicine through leadership – locally, regionally, nationally or internationally – with priority given to those with demonstrated leadership within SAEM. The Awards Committee wishes to consider as many exceptional candidates as possible. The awards committee is committed to an inclusive process of granting awards, reflecting the full spectrum of diversity of our membership. We encourage you to nominate a diverse pool of candidates for all SAEM awards.

    Recipient
    • Cherri Hobgood, MD

      Professor of Emergency Medicine with Tenure

      Indiana University

      Dr. Cherri Hobgood is the Rolly McGrath Distinguished Professor and Chair of Emergency Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine. She received her medical degree from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in 1989 and her clinical training in the UNC Emergency Medicine residency program. At the completion of her emergency medicine training, Dr. Hobgood joined the faculty of UNC Department of Emergency Medicine under the leadership of Dr. Judith Tintinalli. Throughout her career she has focused her research and educational efforts on designing effective, safe, patient-centered communication in the emergency department. Her educational content and interventions on communication topics such as death notification have been widely incorporated into interprofessional curricula throughout the world. She is the author of more than 100 peer reviewed contributions to the medical literature which have been published in a variety of books and academic journals. As a member of the UNC School of Medicine faculty Dr. Hobgood served in a variety of leadership roles including Director of the Office of Educational Development, Director of the UNC Clinical Skills Center, Associate Dean for Curriculum and Educational Development for the School of Medicine, and Vice Chair of Emergency Medicine
  • Excellence in Research Award

    This award honors a SAEM member who has made outstanding contributions to emergency medicine through the creation and sharing of new knowledge. The Awards Committee wishes to consider as many exceptional candidates as possible. The awards committee is committed to an inclusive process of granting awards, reflecting the full spectrum of diversity of our membership. We encourage you to nominate a diverse pool of candidates for all SAEM awards.

    Recipient
    • Robert Silbergleit, MD

      Professor with Tenure

      University of Michigan

      Robert Silbergleit MD is a Professor of Emergency Medicine at University of Michigan. He graduated from MIT and the University of Michigan Medical School, completed his residency in Emergency Medicine at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, and trained as a research fellow at the George Washington University. Past research involved preclinical models of traumatic and ischemic injury, and clinical investigations in acute stroke care. His current research focuses on confirmatory phase clinical trials of acute interventions for neurological and cardiac emergencies. He is currently a Principal Investigator of the Clinical Coordinating Center for the NIH (NINDS. NHLBI, and NCATS) funded SIREN Emergency Clinical Trials network, as well as a PI for ICECAP, a national multicenter adaptive clinical trial of hypothermia duration in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. He has also been a PI for RAMPART and ESETT, two national multicenter large randomized controlled clinical trials of treatments for acute status epilepticus. Dr. Silbergleit also currently contributes to the leadership of the ongoing BOOST, HOBIT, and C3PO clinical trials. He has served in the leadership of several other large trials including ProTECT and ATACH, and the Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials (NETT) network, the predecessor of SIREN. Dr. Silbergleit is dedicated to improving the structure and efficiency of the clinical trial enterprise. He has been a co-investigator on a regulatory science grant from the NIH and FDA to investigate adaptive clinical trial methods in confirmatory phase trials. He also has expertise in clinical and research ethics. He is vice-chair of the Michigan Medicine Research Ethics Committee, and a long-standing member of the Clinical Ethics Committee. He has written and presented extensively on the ethics and regulation of planned emergency research. He is the Principal Investigator on an NIH funded empirical ethics research project to study local context review by individual and centralized Institutional Review Boards, and an NIH funded supplement on paramedic, investigator, and patient family experiences in emergency research and clinical care. He has served as an editor or reviewer for numerous journals. He has served on several NIH study sections and special emphasis panels, and has served as a reviewer, advisor, or participant for numerous other FDA, NIH, and other Federal review panels, advisory groups, or workshops. He has authored over 100 peer reviewed articles and commentaries, and 17 book chapters.

  • Hal Jayne Excellence in Education Award

    This award honors a SAEM member who has made outstanding contributions to emergency medicine through the teaching of others and and the improvement of pedagogy. The Awards Committee wishes to consider as many exceptional candidates as possible. The awards committee is committed to an inclusive process of granting awards, reflecting the full spectrum of diversity of our membership. We encourage you to nominate a diverse pool of candidates for all SAEM awards.

    Recipient
    • Michael Gisondi, MD

      Associate Professor, Vice Chair of Education, Mentor

      Stanford School of Medicine - Department of Emergency Medicine

      Dr. Michael Gisondi is the inaugural Vice Chair of Education in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University. He is the Principal and Founder of the Precision Education and Assessment Research Lab (The PEARL), Co-Director of the Scholarly Concentration in Medical Education, and the faculty advisor for LGBTQ+ Meds at Stanford School of Medicine. He is a Distinguished Member of the Stanford Medicine Teaching and Mentoring Academy. Dr. Gisondi is a medical education researcher and an expert in the application of social media in medical education. He is a member of the editorial boards of Academic Life in Emergency Medicine, International Clinician Educators Blog, and the Journal of Education and Teaching in Emergency Medicine. He is an associate editor for the textbook, Emergency Medicine, and conference faculty with the national certification course, EPEC-EM: Education in Palliative and End-of-life Care in Emergency Medicine. Dr Gisondi previously served on the Board of Directors for the Council of Residency Directors in Emergency Medicine. Earlier in his career, he served as Residency Program Director, Medical Education Scholarship Fellowship Director (SAEM-approved), and Director of the Feinberg Academy of Medical Educators at Northwestern University. In 2014, Dr. Gisondi was awarded the National Faculty Teaching Award of the American College of Emergency Physicians and was named Alumnus of the Year by Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. He completed the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Chair Development Program and the Stanford Medicine Leadership Academy.
  • SAEM Organizational Advancement Award

    The SAEM Organizational Advancement Award honors an SAEM member that has made significant contributions to programs, services, or leadership within the Society that has advanced the mission and trajectory of SAEM. The Executive Committee of SAEM will nominate 2-3 candidates each year for the award. The SAEM Board of Directors will select the award recipient from the pool of nominees. The award will be presented at the SAEM Annual Meeting each year.

    Recipient
    • Richard Rothman

      Dr. Richard Rothman, MD, PhD is the Executive Vice Chair and Vice Chair for Research for the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University. He is also a Professor of Emergency Medicine with a Joint Appointment in the Division of Infectious Diseases and is a practicing emergency physician at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dr. Rothman has been conducting research on varied infectious disease conditions in emergency settings since 1996, with areas of focus including HIV, sepsis,  influenza, and now SARS CoV-2.  He has a particular interest and expertise in the development and translation of rapid molecular diagnostics and has published extensively on this topic. Dr. Rothman has served as the Principal Investigator for a number of federally funded studies including multi-center studies designed to advance methods for early infectious disease detection in emergency settings, and improve approaches to the conduct of therapeutic trials during a pandemic. Currently, he serves as the Principal Investigator and Co-Director for the NIH/NIAID Center of Excellence for Influenza Surveillance and Research which now includes studies on COVID-19. At SAEM, Dr. Rothman is one of the founding members of the EMTIDE group a network of academic emergency departments focused on research, practice, and policy on emerging and transmissible infectious diseases.
  • Marcus L. Martin Leadership in Diversity and Inclusion Award

    SAEM seeks nominations for the Marcus L. Martin Leadership in Diversity and Inclusion Award. This award honors a SAEM member who has made exceptional contributions to advancing diversity and inclusion in emergency medicine through leadership – locally, regionally, nationally or internationally – with priority given to those with demonstrated leadership within SAEM. Diversity is the range of human differences, including but not limited to race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, social class, physical ability or attributes, religious or ethical values system, national origin, and political beliefs. Inclusion is the achievement of a work environment in which all individuals are treated fairly and respectfully, have equal access to opportunities and resources, and can contribute fully to the organization's success. The Awards Committee wishes to consider as many exceptional candidates as possible. The committee is committed to an inclusive process of granting awards, reflecting the full spectrum of diversity of our membership. We encourage you to nominate a diverse pool of candidates for all SAEM awards.

    Recipient
    • Iris Reyes, MD

      Professor

      Department of Emergency Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania

      Iris Reyes, MD, FACEP is a Professor of Clinical Emergency at the Perelman School of Medicine (PSOM) at the University of Pennsylvania. She has served as an Attending Physician in the Emergency Department at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania since completing her fellowship in 1989. Dr. Reyes has served as an Advisory Dean for the PSOM Office of Student Affairs, an Ombudsman, a member of the Admissions Committee at Penn Med, and as a faculty preceptor for the Medical Spanish Elective and the Latino Medical Student Association. Dr. Reyes developed and has precepted the Minority Mentoring Seminar Series (aka “Cracking the Clerkships”) designed to provide mentoring resources for medical students from backgrounds under-represented in Medicine for over 20 years. Her longstanding interest in the impact of cultural diversity on healthcare delivery led to her co- development of a mandatory course for first year medical students at Penn Med. The course was absorbed into the broader “Doctoring Course” and continues to address issues such as racism in Medicine, spirituality in healthcare, and the proper use of interpreters for patients with limited English proficiency. Dr. Reyes’s passion for improving diversity in Medicine and the need to improve the pipeline and support of under-represented minority residents and faculty led to her founding of the UPHS-CHOP Alliance of Minority Physicians (AMP) in 2012. AMP promotes the recruitment, retention, mentoring and the overall success of minority residents and fellows training in the University of Pennsylvania Health System and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. AMP’s efforts have led to a near doubling of the minority residents, fellows and faculty at Penn Medicine and CHOP. It has also promoted an expansion of Visiting clerkship programs for minority medical students from 1 to 15 participating residency programs. This year, AMP faculty members led the charge to demand the elimination of institutional racism at our health systems.

  • FOAMed Excellence in Education Award

    This award honors a SAEM member who has made outstanding contributions to the online learning community of emergency medicine through innovative and engaging FOAMed content. The Awards Committee wishes to consider as many exceptional candidates as possible. The awards committee is committed to an inclusive process of granting awards, reflecting the full spectrum of diversity of our membership. We encourage you to nominate a diverse pool of candidates for all SAEM awards.

    Recipient
    • Lauren M. Westafer, DO, MPH, MS

      Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine

      University of Massachusetts Medical School - Baystate

      Dr. Westafer, DO, MPH, MS (she/her) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School - Baystate and Director of the Emergency Medicine Research Fellowship. Lauren is an implementation science researcher and FOAMed enthusiast. She is author of the blog, The Short Coat, and cofounder of the emergency medicine podcast, FOAMcast. Dr. Westafer lectures internationally on social media in medical education, critical appraisal and journal club design, pulmonary embolism, and advancing the quality of healthcare for LGBTQI+ patients. In addition, she serves as the Social Media Editor and a research methodology editor for Annals of Emergency Medicine and an Associate Editor for the NEJM Journal Watch Emergency Medicine.
  • Advancement of Women in Academic Emergency Medicine Award

    SAEM is soliciting nominees for the Advancement of Women in Academic Emergency Medicine Award. This award honors a SAEM member who has made significant contributions to the advancement of women in academic emergency medicine. The Awards Committee wishes to consider as many exceptional candidates as possible. The awards committee is committed to an inclusive process of granting awards, reflecting the full spectrum of diversity of our membership. We encourage you to nominate a diverse pool of candidates for all SAEM awards.

    Recipient
    • Cherri Hobgood, MD

      Professor of Emergency Medicine with Tenure

      Indiana University

      Dr. Cherri Hobgood is the Rolly McGrath Distinguished Professor and Chair of Emergency Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine. She received her medical degree from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in 1989 and her clinical training in the UNC Emergency Medicine residency program. At the completion of her emergency medicine training, Dr. Hobgood joined the faculty of UNC Department of Emergency Medicine under the leadership of Dr. Judith Tintinalli. Throughout her career she has focused her research and educational efforts on designing effective, safe, patient-centered communication in the emergency department. Her educational content and interventions on communication topics such as death notification have been widely incorporated into interprofessional curricula throughout the world. She is the author of more than 100 peer reviewed contributions to the medical literature which have been published in a variety of books and academic journals. As a member of the UNC School of Medicine faculty Dr. Hobgood served in a variety of leadership roles including Director of the Office of Educational Development, Director of the UNC Clinical Skills Center, Associate Dean for Curriculum and Educational Development for the School of Medicine, and Vice Chair of Emergency Medicine
  • Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award

    The Arnold P. Gold Foundation has selected the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) to administer the Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award to a practicing emergency medicine physician who exemplifies compassionate, patient-centered care. The awards committee is committed to an inclusive process of granting awards, reflecting the full spectrum of diversity of our membership. We encourage you to nominate a diverse pool of candidates for all SAEM awards.

    Recipient
    • Eve Losman, MD

      Clinical Assistant Professor

      Department of Emergency Medicine, Michigan Medicine

      In 2016, Dr. Losman joined the Washtenaw Health Initiative –Opioid Project and in 2017 she became her department’s representative on the Michigan Medicine Pain Committee and QI Controlled Substances Committee.In 2018, Dr. Losman joined the CDC funded Injury Prevention Center. She is involved in 3 projects focused on the Opioid Epidemic; creation of a web-based toolkit for providers and the public regarding appropriate prescribing and the care of patients with Opiate Use Disorder; real time tracking of opiate overdoses to assist public health, EMS, and law enforcement to respond more effectively and rapidly to community needs; creation of a toolkit for post overdose care from the Emergency Department. She is part of the ReWrite the Script team at Michigan Medicine as well as the MEDIC QI project working within her department as well as institution wide on clinician education regarding appropriate use of opiates, curbing the inappropriate prescribing of opiates, and alternative strategies to control acute pain. She is leadingthe harm reduction effort to educate opiate overdose patients in the ED regarding the use of Naloxone rescue.As evidenced by the many activities detailed above and below, Dr. Losman has a longstanding commitment to the education of EM residentsand the emergency care of older adults. More recently she has applied her leadership and organizational skills to the area of public health with a focus inappropriate ED utilization and the Opioid Epidemic. She has found ways to combine these interests in a meaningful and productive manner.
  • Public Health Leadership Award

    Emergency Medicine is a specialty on the frontlines. Emergency physicians are uniquely positioned to be leaders and catalysts in addressing major public health challenges such as environmental concerns, injury prevention strategies, increasing societal vulnerability to emerging infectious diseases, and numerous others. Developing effective solutions to these challenges often requires innovation through interdisciplinary collaborations across not only the field of Healthcare, but also Government/Policy and Technology sectors. This award honors an SAEM member who has made exceptional contributions to addressing public health challenges through interdisciplinary leadership in innovation - locally, regionally, nationally, internationally. These contributions and accomplishments should demonstrate foresight and leading-edge innovative thinking. We encourage you to nominate a diverse pool of candidates for all SAEM awards.

    Recipient
    • Michael Lyons, MD, MPH

      Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine

      University of Cincinnati

      Michael S. Lyons, MD, MPH has been a transformative and nationally recognized leader at the intersection of emergency medicine and public health for nearly 20 years, most predominantly in the areas of transmissible infectious diseases and substance use disorders. After completing his undergraduate degree at Northwestern University, he attended Duke Medical School with election to AOA and then served as Resident and Chief Resident at the University of Cincinnati (UC), where he is now Associate Professor. As faculty, Dr. Lyons completed a Master of Public Health degree at Emory University and has headed the Division of Public Health and Health Services Research since 2002. Dr. Lyons has worked tirelessly to reduce fragmentation that divides emergency medicine from public health and other healthcare entities. In particular, he leads the UC Early Intervention Program (EIP), an ever-expanding array of clinical prevention services continuously funded for two decades by a variety of public health, community, healthcare, and industry sponsors. The EIP was the first and most notable example of health departments directly funding prevention programs in EDs and innovates operational changes to advance public health practice in healthcare settings that do not require external funding. EIP is also active in the community, most recently operating a massive $multi-million countywide COVID screening effort. Over 100 nurses, physicians, researchers, and other allied health professionals began their careers as EIP service providers, and Dr. Lyons has directly mentored countless others in projects and clinical practice. This body of clinical, educational, and administrative work directly informs Dr. Lyons’ research, which has been variously funded by NIH, CDC, AHRQ, EMF, and SAMHSA and required leadership of multi-disciplinary collaborations involving infectious diseases, gastroenterology, virology, addiction and mental health, communications, sociology, economics, healthcare informatics, and operations simulation. Dr. Lyons has authored multiple seminal papers involving ED screening and linkageto-care practices, led the planning and evaluation of the nation’s largest per capita regional naloxone distribution effort, and is currently honored to serve as co-lead of Ohio’s “Intervention Operations Core” in the unprecedented $350 million NIH/SAMHSA HEALing Communities Study, promoting multisector system and practice change to substantially reduce opioid overdose deaths. He has also played a leading role in development of the EM Transmissible Infectious Diseases and Epidemics (EMTIDE) SAEM interest group, served as an invited co-editor for special supplement issues to Annals of Emergency Medicine and Public Health Reports, and was an invited speaker for an American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) Congressional Briefing on the role medical colleges can play in community health. 
  • Mentor Award

    SAEM seeks nominations for the Mentor Award. This award honors a SAEM member who has mentored the career advancement of other SAEM members.

    Recipient
    • Phillip A. Scott, MD, MBA

      Professor

      Department of Emergency Medicine, Michigan Medicine

      As the originator of the acute stroke team at the University of Michigan, I have been extensively involved with clinical stroke research for 25 years. Over that period, our team has developed a comprehensive, multispecialty approach to the treatment of patients with cerebrovascular disease. This effort extensively involves emergency medicine, neurology, neurosurgery, radiology, interventional neuroradiology, neuro-intensivists, rehabilitation and partners from multiple other disciplines within the health system. Our system has demonstrated ability not only within the walls of the hospital, but also the ability to design, implement and conduct research in the community and regional settings to enhance stroke care access and knowledge among patients and external providers – from their homes, to the streets (EMS), to the hospitals. My background in recruiting, developing, and implementing multidisciplinary systems and teams for the delivery of acute stroke care and NIH-supported research across multiple clinical trials over the past two decades provides key insights into the proposed research platform. I have personally participated in over 35 clinical trials, serving as site principal investigator in over ten and as the overall principal investigator in seven. I was the Principal Investigator on the INSTINCT Trial (RO1 NS050372) examining methods to enhance stroke systems of care. That experience, along with my background in clinical trial development, engineering, and newer business and marketing expertise, provide a tremendous foundation for the STEP program. My research involvement has focused on clinical trial work in: 1) development of population- and systems-based approaches to acute stroke care and research, particularly focusing on community delivery of acute stroke care (second-stage knowledge translation) 2) hyper-acute, thrombolytic, based stroke treatment strategies, 3) efforts to extend stroke treatment via neuronal protection mechanisms (both pharmacologic and hypothermic), 4) the development of mechanical-based clot removal and lysis in stroke, 5) methods to enhance treatment for subarachnoid hemorrhage care via hypothermia, 6) primary stroke prevention via enhanced identification of atrial fibrillation. My work has been extensively funded by the NIH and I have led and/or participated in numerous consortia, multicenter clinical trials, and trial networks, including: INSTINCT (PI: RO1 NS050372), SPOTRIAS (P50 NS044283, NETT (U01 NS056975) and STROKENET (co-PIs with Dr. Brown: U10 NS086526). In August, 2013 my mother suffered a large and debilitating stroke which was not treated effectively due to the time limitations of therapy at that time. During my subsequent partial sabbatical, I obtained an advanced business degree from the University of Michigan with the intent of applying the science of enhancing system efficiency and marketing promotion to clinical trial findings in order to accelerate uptake of research results by healthcare provider and patient populations. I believe the STEP program will greatly enhance our ability as scientists and clinicians to rapidly improve systems to reduce the burden of stroke on our communities and may be leveraged to reduce and eliminate barriers to broad community implementation of new results.
  • Mid-Career Investigator Award

    SAEM identifies up to two (2) recipients for the Mid-Career Investigator Award. This award recognizes those SAEM members who have demonstrated commitment and achievement in research during the mid-stage of their academic career. The Society’s core mission includes the creation of knowledge, and this award recognizes those who have achieved success in this sphere. The awards committee is committed to an inclusive process of granting awards, reflecting the full spectrum of diversity of our membership. We encourage you to nominate a diverse pool of candidates for all SAEM awards.

    Recipient
    • Nicholas M. Mohr, MD, MS

      Professor of Emergency Medicine

      University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine

      Nicholas Mohr MD MS is a Professor of Emergency Medicine, Anesthesia Critical Care and Epidemiology. Within the University of Iowa Department of Emergency Medicine, Dr. Mohr serves as the Vice Chair for Research and directs the Emergency Medicine Critical Care Fellowship and Physician Scientist Training Program as well as serving as the Assistant Fellowship Director in Critical Care in the Department of Anesthesia. A native of Bettendorf, Iowa, he is a 2002 graduate from Iowa State University with a BS in Mechanical Engineering. He obtained his MD from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in 2006, followed by residency in Emergency Medicine at Indiana University from 2006-2009 and a Critical Care Fellowship at Washington University in St Louis from 2009-2011. After returning to the University of Iowa as a faculty member in 2011, he obtained his MS in Clinical Investigation in 2014. Dr Mohr currently resides in Iowa City, IA where he lives with his wife and four energetic sons. Dr Mohr is a health services researcher with a focus on the regionalization of rural emergency medicine and critical care services with expertise in sepsis, acute respiratory failure, and early trauma care. Dr. Mohr is currently funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to examine the effect of telemedicine on sepsis care. He has been funded previously by the Emergency Medicine Foundation, the Children's Miracle Network, and the Injury Prevention Research Center. He has authored more than 30 first author, peer-reviewed publications focused on the intersection between emergency medicine and critical care. Dr. Mohr is currently a co-principal investigator with Dr. David Talan on two Centers for Disease Control and Prevention COVID-19 projects; one examines the risks of becoming infected with COVID-19 while working in an emergency department (COVERED) and the second is a COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness project (PREVENT).
    • Frederick Kofi Korley, MD, PhD

      Associate Professor with tenure

      University of Michigan

      Frederick Korley, M.D., Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan. He received his medical and emergency medicine education at Northwestern University School of Medicine, serving as chief resident during his final year of training. He also received doctoral training in clinical investigation at the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health with election into Phi Beta Kappa. His doctoral thesis represents the first published study of the diagnostic accuracy of a high sensitivity troponin assay in a US emergency department population. He was the inaugural recipient of the Robert E. Meyerhoff Assistant Professorship at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Korley’s research work is focused on the development of diagnostics and therapeutics for TBI. With regards to the development of diagnostics for TBI, Dr. Korley holds a patent for a panel of biofluid-based biomarkers for brain injury detection and outcome prognostication. He is a co-investigator of the largest observational study of TBI in the US (the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in TBI, TRACK-TBI). As part of this work, he leads efforts in the clinical validation of novel brain injury biomarkers. In collaboration with colleagues in engineering, Dr. Korley is also developing a credit card sized microfluidic device for point-of-care measurement of TBI bioflud biomarkers. Dr. Korley is also a co-investigator in the clinical coordinating center of the NIH funded Strategies to Innovate Emergency Clinical Care Trials (SIREN) network. He is a principal investigator of two federally funded research studies run by the SIREN network, that are investigating the use of biofluid-based biomarkers for 1) subject selection in clinical trials; 2) monitoring individual patient response to promising neuroprotective agents. He also participates in the DoD/FDA funded TBI Endpoints Development (TED) Initiative, a public-private partnership examining effective measures or “endpoints” of brain injury and recovery. With regards to the development of therapeutics for TBI, Dr. Korley is a principal investigator of a SIREN network NINDS funded phase II adaptive design clinical trial that is investigating the optimal treatment parameters of hyperbaric oxygen that is most likely to demonstrate improvement in the rate of good neurological outcome versus control in a subsequent confirmatory trial. During the on-going COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Korley is leveraging his expertise in the testing of novel therapeutics to lead an NHLBI funded multi-center clinical trial of COVID-19 convalescent plasma in outpatients (C3PO) as one of the national co-PIs. With enrollment of participants at >50 emergency departments across the country, this study represents a significant contribution by the emergency medicine community to test a promising therapeutic in COVID-19 patients who are discharged home from the emergency department. Dr. Korley has >70 peer-reviewed publications in high impact journals such as JAMA, Lancet, JAMA Neurology, JAMA Psychiatry, JAMA Cardiology, and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. He is a member of the NINDS Neurological Sciences and Disorders A (NSD-A) study section.
  • Young Investigator Award

    SAEM identifies up to three (3) recipients for the Young Investigator Award each year. This award recognizes those SAEM members who have demonstrated commitment and achievement in research during the early stage of their academic career. The Society’s core mission includes the creation of knowledge, and this award recognizes those who have achieved early success in this sphere. The awards committee is committed to an inclusive process of granting awards, reflecting the full spectrum of diversity of our membership. We encourage you to nominate a diverse pool of candidates for all SAEM awards.

    Recipient
    • Michelle P. Lin, MD, MPH, MS

      Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine

      Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

      Michelle Lin, MD, MPH, MS, FACEP is an emergency physician and health services researcher whose goal is to improve the value, equity and patient-centeredness of emergency care. Dr. Lin is the recipient of a five-year grant from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI/ NIH) to validate a novel instrument to assess patient-reported outcomes after adult ED asthma visits and evaluate the association with subsequent acute care utilization, after adjusting for geospatially coded environmental & social risk factors. Her prior work has been funded by the Emergency Medicine Foundation and American Board of Medical Specialties and examines variation in ED outcomes and the influence of alternative payment models on acute care delivery and payment. Dr. Lin is engaged in research and implementation projects on career development to enhance diversity and equity; actively mentors several fellows, residents, and medical students. She holds leadership roles on multiple national committees, including the National Quality Forum, the American College of Emergency Physicians Quality Committee, and Academy of Women in Academic Emergency Medicine. Dr. Lin completed a fellowship in Health Policy Research at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and a Masters in Clinical Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She is a graduate of Northwestern University and completed residency at Bellevue Hospital and NYU Medical Center.

    • Howard S. Kim, MD MS

      Assistant Professor

      Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

      Howard S. Kim, MD MS is an emergency medicine physician and health services researcher at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. He completed his residency in emergency medicine at Denver Health Medical Center in 2015 and received formal training in health services and outcomes research and patient-reported outcomes measurement. Dr. Kim’s research agenda is dedicated to improving the safety and effectiveness of acute pain management and reducing harms associated with opioid use disorder. Dr. Kim has been continuously funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) for the last six years, including early career research training through AHRQ T32 and K12 awards. Currently, he is the PI of an AHRQ R01 award evaluating ED physical therapy for acute low back pain (R01HS027426), the Site PI for a multisite NIDA clinical trial evaluating ED-initiated buprenorphine for opioid withdrawal (UG1DA015831, PI: D’Onofrio), the Site PI for an early phase pain investigation clinical network (U24NS115679, PI: Aufderheide). Over the last few years, Dr. Kim has published extensively on the topics of opioid prescribing, marijuana legalization, ED physical therapy, and opioid harm reduction in journals such as Academic Emergency Medicine, Annals of Emergency Medicine, the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA Network Open, and Physical Therapy.
    • Amber Sabbatini, MD, MPH

      Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine

      University of Washington

      I am a practicing emergency physician and federally-funded health services researcher with expertise in using claims and administrative datasets to understand how the delivery of emergency care affects patient outcomes, resource utilization, and quality. To date, much of my research has revolved around examining hospital admission practices and their consequences, including a special emphasis on observation care. Most recently, I have been awarded several federal and foundation grants to study the impact of payer policies and delivery reforms on health utilization and costs and their intersection with emergency care. These include a pilot award from the UW Population Health Initiative to examine the association between behavioral health integration under Washington state’s Medicaid Transformation Program and preventable ED use, an R34 from NIMH to study the impacts of state Medicaid policies targeting high-utilizers of the ED on mental health outcomes and a newly awarded R01 from the NIA to study how Medicare policies including the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program have affected the growth of observation stays and impacted outcomes for older adults requiring hospitalization. I am currently appointed as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Health Services at the University of Washington. I am additionally an affiliate faculty member for the Center for Health Innovation & Policy Science (CHIPS) and a core faculty in the Department of Emergency Medicine’s Section of Population Health. After completing my emergency medicine training in 2012, I undertook a health services research fellowship at the University of Michigan. I then joined the faculty at University of Washington and was subsequently awarded a K12 career development award in patient-centered outcomes research from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. I have been actively involved in the implementation of Washington state’s Medicaid Transformation Project in King County and serve on multiple workgroups related to improving care coordination and ED utilization among high-needs Medicaid patients. These activities complement my current grant-funded research in the Medicaid space and provide a stakeholder network for translating research into policy. I maintain active membership in the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). I served on the SAEM grants committee for several years, and currently serve on the ACEP Patient Safety & Quality and Research committees. Finally, this past summer I served as a reviewer on an NHLBI R21 Special Emphasis Panel focusing on secondary analyses of existing datasets.
  • Fellow Awards

    The awards are presented during the SAEM Annual Meeting. Recipients must be SAEM members and have completed a residency in Emergency Medicine prior to fellowship. Previous recipients of the award are ineligible for further nomination for this award.

    Recipient
    • Andrew Joseph Branting, MD

      Emergency Medicine/Critical Care Medicine Fellow

      UC Davis Health System

      Critical Care Fellow Award Recipient

    • Aaron E. Robinson, MD, MPH

      Emergency Medical Services Fellow

      Hennepin County Medical Center

       

      EMS Fellow Award Recipient

    • Nicole Klekowski, MD

      Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellow

      University of Michigan Dept. of Emergency Medicine

      Pediatric EM Fellow Award Recipient

  • RAMS Leadership in Emergency Medicine Award

    This award is open to any U.S. medical student or practicing emergency medicine resident taking a leading role in their student interest group or residency program and making an impact on the local, regional, national, or international level through their efforts.

    Recipient
    • Samita M. Heslin, MD, MBA, MPH, MA

      Resident Physician & Chief Resident

      Stony Brook University: Department of Emergency Medicine

       

  • RAMS Innovative Educator Award

    It is vital to have educators that are dedicated to being innovative in emergency medicine. Innovation requires creativity and courage, while education requires a strong knowledge base and a sense of responsibility for learners' needs.

    Recipient
    • Leonardo Aliaga, MD

      Chief Resident Physician

      UC Davis Health

       

  • RAMS Excellence in Research Award

    Emergency Medicine depends on efficiency and a wide breadth of clinical knowledge to care of patients in the acute setting. Evidence based medicine has revolutionized how the healthcare system operates to make sure the conscientious best supported plans of care are implemented. SAEM RAMS understands the importance of research in providing the best possible patient care. For this reason, we would like to recognize an EM resident or medical student who has had a role in the development of evidence-based medicine in the specialty.

    Recipient
    • Ryan A. Coute, DO

      Resident Physician

      University of Alabama at Birmingham

      Dr. Ryan Coute is an Emergency Medicine Resident at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His primary interest is resuscitation science research with a focus on cardiac arrest treatment and outcome disparities, burden of disease estimation, and healthcare policy. His research training includes the prestigious Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Fellowship, completed under the direction of Robert W. Neumar MD PhD at the University of Michigan. Dr. Coute has published more than 20 peer-reviewed manuscripts, including seven as primary author in high impact journals such as Circulation Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, Resuscitation, Journal of the American Heart Association, and the American Heart Journal. His research has received multiple high-profile awards including two American Heart Association (AHA) Young Investigator Awards, an AHA Best Abstract Award for Resuscitation Science, and the 2020 Resident Academic Achievement Award from the Council of Residency Directors of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Coute is the recipient of two resident research grants funded by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and the Emergency Medicine Foundation, and his long-term goal is to become an independent NIH-funded academic clinical scientist.
  • Medical Student Excellence in Emergency Medicine Award

    SAEM is pleased to sponsor the Medical Student Excellence in Emergency Medicine Award. This award is made available to each medical school to select a senior medical student who has demonstrated excellence in the specialty of emergency medicine.