Medical Student Benefits

Interested in Joining SAEM?

Are you interested in Academic Emergency Medicine? Looking for an advisor or mentor? Want to get involved in medical education, clinical research, or simply learn what Academic Emergency Medicine is all about? The SAEM community is here to help. Here’s everything you need to know to get started:

WHAT IS SAEM?

SAEM, or the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine, is one of the largest professional organizations in Emergency Medicine in the United States. SAEM has a strong focus on the development of academic Emergency Medicine, including research, education, career development, and advancement in patient care. The journal Academic Emergency Medicine is our official publication. SAEM hosts a large Annual Meeting each May during which Emergency Medicine professionals gather from around the country to present research, exchange ideas, collaborate and network in order to advance our mission of excellence in Academic Emergency Medicine.

WHAT IS ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE?

A career in Academic Emergency Medicine means that you work primarily within an academic/ teaching institution. In addition to focusing on clinical practice, you will also be responsible for education, research or administration. To make room for these additional activities, clinical hours are often reduced. Academic EM physicians tend to have an “academic niche,” or a specific area of interest in which they strive for leadership and advancement. This is in contrast to working within a community or non-teaching institution, where physicians focus primarily on clinical practice (seeing patients).

For more information, please see:

EMRA Guide to an Academic EM Career

Emergency Medicine Career Choice: A Profile of Factors and Influences from the AAMC Graduation Questionnaires

HOW DOES SAEM DIFFER FROM OTHER PROFESSIONAL EMERGENCY MEDICINE GROUPS SUCH AS ACEP OR CORD?

SAEM has a specific mission to advance academic Emergency Medicine. Because of this, we have a stronger research focus than the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), who has a broader mission to advocate for all of Emergency Medicine in general. While SAEM has a similar teaching/education focus as the Council of Emergency Medicine Directors (CORD), the academic mission is not limited to residents, and extends to medical students as well as fellows, junior faculty, and any physician in pursuit of career development.

WHAT CAN SAEM DO FOR ME?

SAEM connects you to the Academic Emergency Medicine community. SAEM is the largest society of academic Emergency Medicine professionals in the country, including medical students, residents, junior and senior faculty, researchers, administrators, and others. SAEM contains a number of Interest Groups and Academies that support particular interests in Emergency Medicine, including the Academy of Emergency Ultrasound (AEUS), the Academy for Women in Emergency Medicine (AWEM), the Simulation Academy (SIM), and many others. SAEM also has its own Resident and Student Advisory Committee (RSAC), as well as liaisons with the Graduate Medical Education Committee and the Emergency Medicine Resident Association (EMRA). SAEM can connect you to these organizations to network and get involved. To find out more, see the Resources section below.  

SAEM is a source of mentorship, which has been shown to be one of the most important factors for successful academic careers. Mentorship opportunities are available in-person during SAEM’s Annual Meeting and virtually through SAEM’s many committees and interest groups. SAEM is also working to develop an electronic Mentorship Database for all SAEM members.

CAN I JOIN SAEM AS A JUNIOR MEDICAL STUDENT?

It is never too early to join. Even as a first year medical student, there are significant benefits to SAEM membership, including access to publications and resources, participation in the Annual Meeting, and a chance to become involved in committees, Academies, and other SAEM groups. If you are a senior medical student who has already chosen Emergency Medicine as a specialty, then your involvement is even more crucial: you can advocate for your fellow students and get exposure to EM leaders and advisors who can help you decide if an academic career is right for you.

I’M IN. HOW DO I SIGN UP?

First, see if your local Emergency Medicine interest group, advisor, or institution is able to obtain discounted membership for medical students. To become a SAEM member, register here.

Want to Get Involved in SAEM During Medical School?

As a medical student in SAEM, you can become involved in leadership, advocacy, and education through SAEM at any point during your medical school training. You will also have access to a number of resources tailored to medical students pursuing (or simply interested in) an academic career in Emergency Medicine.

WHAT LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS?

Almost all SAEM groups will be amenable to interested medical students, so don’t hesitate to contact them directly. If you are looking for something more formalized, there are two SAEM groups that specifically seek out medical students for leadership positions:

The SAEM Medical Student Ambassador’s Program (MSA)

Description: Each year, the SAEM Program Committee looks for enthusiastic and responsible medical students from around the country to work directly with SAEM leadership to assist in the planning, coordination, and execution of SAEM’s Annual Meeting. This group of medical students serves as the primary volunteer force at the Annual Meeting.

Benefits: 

  • Opportunity to attend the full SAEM Annual Meeting and participate in didactics, poster sessions, and educational activities
  • Waiver of the SAEM Annual Meeting registration fee
  • One-on-one meeting with a member of SAEM leadership to act as your academic mentor
  • A personal letter from the SAEM Program Committee Chair to your Dean of Student Affairs to acknowledge your contributions

Obligations: 

  • Be available for 1 week in May to attend the entire SAEM Annual Meeting
  • You will be assigned specific duties during certain times at the Annual Meeting, but will be free to attend the rest of the conference.

The Resident & Student Advisory Committee (RSAC)

Description: The RSAC is comprised of residents, medical students, and faculty committed to the advancement of Academic Emergency Medicine training and education. RSAC is the voice of the resident and student members of SAEM, and works with other SAEM committees and faculty to represent the needs and goals of trainees. Positions are available for medical students to lead subcommittees on mentorship, publications, and SAEM Annual Meeting content and events.

Benefits:

  • Creation of student-driven didactics and events for the SAEM Annual Meeting
  • Frequent contact with SAEM leadership including the Board of Directors, the Program Committee, the SAEM Academies, and others
  • Flexibility to contribute your own ideas and innovations to a group of peers
  • Opportunity to meet and work with medical students from other institutions  

Obligations:

  • Commitment varies widely depending on subcommittee involvement, and can range from a single newsletter article contribution once a year to full subcommittee chairmanship
  • The majority of work occurs by phone and email throughout the year
  • In-person meetings at the SAEM Annual Meeting and the ACEP Scientific Assembly are strongly encouraged

How to Apply: To join the RSAC, please contact the RSAC Co-Chairs to state your interest. Medical students at all levels of training are welcome!

WHAT OTHER OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS?

The Medical Student Excellence in Emergency Medicine Award

This award is made available to each medical school to select a senior medical student who has demonstrated excellence in the specialty of emergency medicine. Each medical school is limited to one recipient each year. See the application here.

Medical Student Grant Programs

SAEM sponsors two grant programs for medical student research and innovation:

The SAEM Emergency Medicine Interest Group (EMIG) grant

The EMF/SAEM Medical Student Research Grant


Medical Student Resources

General Resources

The EMRA Medical Student Survival Guide

The EM Advisor Blog

General Advice to EM Students from CDEM

The Residency Application Process

The SAEM Residency Directory provides detailed information on each of the residency programs approved by the ACGME.

The AMA FREIDA Database provides some useful supplemental information.

The NMRP Match Statistics published annually by the National Resident Matching Program.

The ALiEM EM Match Advice page is curated by the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALieM) team and contains information and advice from residency directors and medical education experts on everything from residency interviews to Match statistics.

The Residency Interview by Dr. Jamie Collings provides an insider’s perspective on how to prepare for a residency interview and the criteria that residency directors use to evaluate you.

Clerkships & Away Rotations

The SAEM Clerkship Directory features up-to-date, detailed information about each Emergency Medicine (EM) medical student clerkship rotation in the United States.

The VSAS Directory is the gateway to the common application for schools that participate in the AAMC Visiting Student Application Service in the United States.

The SAEM Clerkship Primer provides general advice for EM Clerkships.

The CDEM Curriculum is authored by the SAEM Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM). It offers a vast array of resources for MS3s, MS4s, and those interested in Pediatric EM to help you succeed in diagnosis, patient presentation, and professionalism during clerkships.

How to Obtain a Great SLOR by Dr. Adam Kellogg gives an insider’s perspective on the criteria that clerkship directors use while writing a letter of recommendation.

When and Where to Do an EM Rotation by Dr. Adrienne Birnbaum and Dr. Wallace Carter explains in great detail how to select an away rotation.

DISCLAIMER: SAEM does not endorse and is not liable for the accuracy, reliability, or quality of any content, advertising, or opinions contained, distributed, linked, or sourced through these resources. Please rely on these materials at your own risk.