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Ask-a-Chair Podcasts

All RAMS Ask-a-Chair podcasts may be found below. Please note they are also available on iTunes

 

Robert F. McCormack, MD; Chair of the Department of Emergency at University at Buffalo


Moderated by:
Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you’ll learn from Dr. McCormack:

  1. You were previously a vice chair and interm chair.  How did these roles prepare you for your role as chair? What other leadership positions earlier in your career helped to prepare you for where you are at today?
  2. During your career as a physician you have participated in several leadership development opportunities such as the Harvard Medical School Leadership for Physician Executives, and you received your MBA while in practice as an MD.  How do you feel that this advanced your career?
  3. What do you look for in a new faculty hire? What are your do’s and don’ts for interviewing?
  4. When you volunteered for this podcast series you mentioned that you were interested in academic/community hybrid development – these are some of the hottest jobs in EM right now.  What advice would you have for a resident about to graduate about the pros and cons of this type of job and how to secure one of these positions?
  5. When in your career did you know that you wanted to go into administration? What advice do you have for business minded medical students and residents?

Michael D. Brown, MD, MSc; Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency at Michigan State, University College of Human Medicine


Moderated by:
Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you’ll learn from Dr. Brown:

  1. When you volunteered to participate in a RAMS podcasts, you mentioned an interest in medical student education. What do you foresee as the biggest educational opportunities for emergency medicine?
  2. What do you think are the most exciting trends in the field of emergency medicine today?
  3. You serve as senior editor for acute and emergency care for the Cochrane database. How did you discover that you were interested in this type of work, and what advice would you have for medical students and residents interested in translating research into practice?
  4. You are the President-elect for the Association of Academic Chairs of EM. What advice do you have for residents or medical students that are interested in getting involved inEM leadership on the national stage?
  5. What advice do you have for medical students and residents regarding what they can do to defend against burnout and prevent things such as early retirement age?

Thomas E. Terndrup, MD; Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency at The Ohio State University


Moderated by:
Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you’ll learn from Dr. Terndrup:

  1. Your bio discusses research interest in disaster medicine and emergency services.  Your resume in this arena includes an NIH grant to create a coalition to enhance surge capacity in central Pennsylvania when you were at Penn State.  How did you work your up to these large scale projects? What advice do you have for early career physicians that would like to work on this scale?
  2. What do you think is the biggest barrier to developing a research project? What about the biggest challenge to sustaining one?
  3. What is the best advice you can offer to a resident trying to start a research career?
  4. Your bio also mentions that you have worked in many different practive environments, including with the national health service corps. How did this variety of experiences help to prepare you for leadership in EM?
  5. Are there any specific trends or advancements in EM that you are particularly excited about?

 

Robert W. Neumar, MD, PhD; Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency at University of Michigan


Moderated by:
Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you’ll learn from Dr. Neumar:

  1. Your particular research interest is in cardiac arrest resuscitation. How did you find out that you were interested in this field? What advice do you have for residents and medical students that want to develop a research career?
  2. You are the co-chair of the international liason committee on resuscitation (ILCOR). How did you get invovled with this organization and what advice do you have for young EM academicians that are interested in promoting our speciality on the international stage?
  3. You do both clinical and bench research. How do you juggle your research, your role as chair, and your time outside of work?
  4. What are the biggest changes that you have seen in the field of EM over the course of your career? What future changes do you anticipate?
  5. Do you have any other advice for residents and medical students aspiring for a career in academics?

 

Robert Femia, MD; Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency at NYU Langone Health


Moderated by:
Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you’ll learn from Dr. Femia:

  1. What do you think is the greatest challenge in delivering Emergency Medicine care today?
  2. What are your thoughts on physician performance metrics and pay-for-performance models? Is this something residents should watch out for when they look for jobs?
  3. The many different paths into an administrative career can be confusing and difficult tobnavigate. Residents could pursue an administrative fellowship, earn an additional degree such as an MBA as you did, or simply get on-the-job administrative experience. Could you describe your perspective on this, and the pro’s and con’s of each?
  4. What can residents interested in administration do to position themselves for a medical director position or other leadership position in Emergency Medicine?
  5. As a Department Chair, what do you look for in a new hire?
  6. Is there any other advice that you’d like to offer to our resident and student listeners?

Andra L. Blomkalns, MD, MBA; Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency at Stanford University


Moderated by:
Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you’ll learn from Dr. Blomkalns:

1. What were some of the major stepping stones in your path to becoming a leader in EM?

2. What were some of the most difficult decisions you had to make in your career?

3. What is your best advice for a medical student or resident who wants to pursue a career in administration and EM leadership?

4. You’ve held numerous national leadership positions including the President of SAEM. What advice do you have for residents and medical students trying to

break out on the national scene?

5. What advice do you have for women in EM seeking leadership positions within their departments and the specialty as a whole?

6. As a woman in Emergency Medicine, do you have any advice for developing mentorship relationships?

 

Robert Shesser, MD; Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency at George Washington University


Moderated by:
Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you’ll learn from Dr. Shesser:

  1. You are the chair of one of the oldest academic departments of EM in the country.  How have you watched emergency medicine change and grow over the course of your career and where do you see it going?
  2. You have held many leadership positions in your institution ranging from residency program director to a a couple of institutional leadership roles.  How do you feel that these roles prepared you for your current role as chair?
  3. You have lectured and consulted all over the world. Have you noted any significant differences between emergency care in the US vs other countries? Had you made any adjustments to your practice based on your international experiences?
  4. As a longstanding member of the leadership of GW EM you have helped to develop many programs.  Do you have any tips and tricks for the development of a new program? What are some common pitfalls that you have learned to avoid?
  5. You have been in the field for 40 years. You have obviously learned something about avoiding burnout.  What can you share about remaining fullfilled in emergency medicine to young clinicians?

Jay Schuur, MD, MHS; Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency at Brown School of Medicine


Moderated by:
Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you’ll learn from Dr. Schuur:

  1. Congratulations on your appointment as chair at Brown.  What has been the biggest adjustment in your new role and at a new institution since transitioning over from Brigham and Womens a few months ago?
  2. What are the biggest challenges that you anticipate personally in your role and more globally as a chair/faculty in emergency medicine?
  3. You pursued further education after residency in several ways including a masters in health sciences as a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar and a certificate of executive leadership from Harvard Business School.  How did these experiences help you rise through the ranks to chairman?
  4. I noticed that you won an award for faculty mentorship during your time at Brigham and Womens. What have you found to be the keys to productive mentoring relationships? What would you recommend to residents or even young faculty seeking out mentorship?
  5. Do you have any other advice for our medical student and resident listeners?

Ian B.K. Martin, MD, MBA; Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency at the Medical College of Wisconsin


Moderated by:
Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you’ll learn from Dr. Martin:

  1. Could you describe how you first became a department chair? Was it a lifelong dream, or something that you aspired to later in your career?
  2. Congratulations on being president-elect of SAEM.  What do you hope to accomplish during your term as president?
  3. What were some of the major stepping stones in your path to becoming a leader in EM?
  4. Your research focuses on delivery of emergency care internationally, particularly in East Africa.  Global health is a growing subspecialty in EM, what advice would you have for medical students and residents interested in global health?
  5. Growing a career in emergency medicine is demanding.  How do you balance your research, your responsibilities as chair, and time away from work?

Deb Diercks, MD; Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center


Moderated by: Chad Mayer, MD, The Ohio State University

What you'll learn from Dr. Diercks:

1. You trained at the University of Cincinnati, which is one of several residency programs known for producing a larger than average number of future chairs. Do you think you always wanted to be chair and thus chose a program like Cincinnati, or do you think it was the program that pushed you in that direction or some combination of both?
2. How do you feel your first job out of residency prepared you for where you are now?
3. Your particular research interest is in the early management of acute coronary syndrome and the intersection of gender along with cardiac biomarkers. How do you think this research has influenced your career as chair and vice versa?
4. What advice do you have for women who may struggle to find their footing in an ever changing, though largely still male dominated emergency medicine administrative world?
5. Do you think advanced degrees such as MBA or in your case a master’s in public health from Harvard are crucial to a career as chair? If not (or if so), how do you feel your master’s degree has helped your career?

 

Angela M. Mills, MD, Chair of Emergency Medicine, J.E. Beaumont Professor of Emergency Medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons


Moderated by: John Hurley, medical student, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University

What you'll learn from Dr. Mills:

1. Congratulations on your new appointment at Columbia. What is the biggest difference you see between being vice chair and chair in your few short months in that role?
2. What are the biggest challenges you anticipate personally in your role and more globally as a chair/faculty in emergency medicine?
3. Similarly to Deb Diercks, you also attended a residency known for larger than average number of chairs. How do you think attending the University of Pennsylvania ultimately influenced where you are today? Or do you think you would have eventually become a chair regardless of where you attended residency?
4. How should residents interested in administration position themselves to become a Medical Director or take on a similar leadership role in academic emergency medicine?
5. How do you think you made yourself the best candidate for your new role as chair and not that you wished to remain as vice chair?

Gail D'Onofrio, MD, MS, Professor and Chair of Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine



Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you'll learn from Dr. Gail D'Onofrio:

1. As the founding chairman of the emergency medicine program at Yale in 2009, what were your biggest challenges then? What challenges do you still face and what would you have done differently?
2. You have an impressive number of grants. How do you juggle your research and role as chairman?
3. As a longstanding mentor to those interested in research, what advice can you give to those medical students, residents, and junior faculty looking to make their entrance into research?
4. You completed the ​Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine program, a fellowship for women faculty, at Yale University. How do you think this experience shaped your career today?
5. What other advice can you provide for female medical students and physicians looking to further their careers, either in research or administration?

Rich Hamilton, MD, Professor and Chair of Emergency Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine


Moderated by: Andrew Starnes, EM Resident at Wake Forest School of Medicine

What you'll learn from Dr. Rich Hamilton:

1. There are a handful of chairs with previous military experience. How do you think your military experience has shaped your career and decision to pursue such a high leadership position?
2. I noticed you have an interest in game theory. First, can you give us a brief overview of game theory? How does this intertwine with your role as faculty in EM and as chair?
3. You ultimately pursued a toxicology fellowship after residency. How has this fellowship shaped your career? If an administrative fellowship had been available (or more readily available) in 1983, would you have pursued that as well or instead of your toxicology fellowship?
4. You have also been heavily involved in training astronauts. What do you enjoy most about this? How has this enriched your career?
5. What is the biggest change you have seen in emergency medicine since graduating the University of Pennsylvania in 1983? 

Chris Miller, MD, Chairman of University Hospitals affiliated with Case Western Medical Center


Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you'll learn from Dr. Chris Miller:

1. You have moved around a lot in your career.  From military to Cincinnati to Virginia, back to Cincinnati and now Cleveland.  What helped you know that picking up and moving was the right thing to do? Were your moves all based on opportunities offered to you or opportunities you made for yourself or both?
2. You transitioned from medical director to chair.  What is the biggest difference you see between these two jobs?
3. In a busy urban ED how do you balance education and the need to continue to see patients and move them through the department?
4. What can residents interested in admin do to position themselves for a medical director position or other leadership position in emergency medicine?
5. What are the pros and cons of an administration fellowship?

Lewis S. Nelson, MD, Professor of Emergency Medicine, Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, Chief of Service, Emergency Department, University Hospital, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School


Moderated by: Andrew Starnes, MD, MPH, EM Resident at Wake Forest School of Medicine


What you'll learn from Dr. Lewis S. Nelson:

1. You are one of several other chairs with dual board certification in toxicology. How do you feel this fellowship has furthered your career and ultimately position as chair? How has your focus on the opioid crisis changed how you practice or manage your staff?
2. What do you look for in a new faculty hire?
3. What advice do you have for medical students and residents looking to ultimately have a career in emergency medicine administration?
4. How has it benefited you to stay in the same relative geographic location for your training?
5. What are the biggest changes you see coming for emergency medicine and medicine in general?

Robert L. Levine, MD, Professor and Founding Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University 



Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine


What you'll learn from Dr. Robert L. Levine:

1. You’re considered one of the founding fathers of EM Critical Care and an authority on EM Critical Care Management. How did you do it? What's the secret to your success?
2. What inspired you to pursue Critical Care? Did you always know that you wanted to do it, or was there a particular situation that altered the course of your career?
3. Emergency Medicine Critical Care is still a relatively new specialty. What do you feel are some of its biggest challenges and barriers to entry?
4. What is your best advice for a medical student or resident who wants to pursue EM Critical Care?
5. Was there anything that surprised you about EM Critical Care that you didn’t know going in?
6. As a Department Chair, what do you look for in a new hire?
7. Is there any other advice you would like to give our resident and student listeners?

Neils K. Rathlev, MD, FACEP, Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School-Baystate


Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine


What you'll learn from Dr. Neils K. Rathlev:

1. Could you describe how you first become a Department Chair? Was it a lifelong dream, or something that happened by accident?
2. What were some of the major stepping stones in your path to becoming a leader in EM?
3. What were some of the most difficult decisions you had to make in your career?
4. What is your best advice for a medical student or resident who wants to pursue a career in administration and succeed?
5. As an operations expert, what are your thoughts on the tension between optimizing ED throughput and carving out time for resident education at academic institutions? How do you balance taking the time to teach at the bedside, and picking up the next patient as quickly as possible to optimize metrics like “Door-to-Doc” time?
6. Is there any other advice you would like to give our resident and student listeners?

Robert McNamara, MD, FAAEM, Professor and Chair of Emergency Medicine, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University



Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you'll learn from Dr. Robert McNamara:

1. What is the single biggest change that you have seen in the field of Emergency Medicine over the course of your career?
2. Where do you think medical education in EM is headed? What should residents and students be most excited about? What should we be most anxious about?
3. What do you think is the biggest challenge in delivering Emergency Medicine care today?
4. You’ve been very involved at both the institutional level at Temple and the national level with AAEM and other professional organizations. What advice do you have for residents and medical students trying to break out on the national scene?
5. From David Chu (MS3 Medical Student from Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine): What can we do to extend our careers as EM physicians and delay burnout/early retirement age?
6. Is there any other leadership advice that you’d like to offer our listeners?

Richard E. Wolfe, MD, Chair of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you'll learn from Dr. Richard E. Wolfe:

1. What is the single biggest change that you have seen in the field of Emergency Medicine over the course of your career? 
2. What educational challenges do you foresee in Emergency Medicine and the “House of Medicine” in general? 
3. (From Shana Zucker, MS2 Medical Student from Tulane University School of Medicine): If a resident or student wants to succeed in EM research, what qualities should they look for in their training program? What sort of institutional support do you think is necessary for successful research and mentorship for trainees? 
4. As a Department Chair, what qualities do you look for when hiring teaching versus research faculty? Do you always look for the “triple threat” who can do everything, or do you feel it’s important to focus on a particular niche? 
5. Is there any other advice you would like to give our resident and student listeners?

David Brown, MD, Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital


Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine


What you'll learn from Dr. David Brown:

1. What do you think is the greatest challenge in delivering Emergency Medicine care today?
2. You oversee an impressive array of services across different practice settings. It seems that many academic institutions are moving towards a systems model, where different hospitals and clinics are integrated and linked under one system. How does this impact medical education? Should residents expect to train in many different settings? Should we be taught how to navigate these networks?
3. What are your thoughts on physician performance metrics and pay-for-performance models? Is this something residents should watch out for when they look for jobs?
4. The many different paths into an administrative career can be confusing and difficult to navigate. Residents could pursue an administrative fellowship, earn an additional degree such as an MBA, or simply get on-the-job administrative experience. Could you describe your perspective on this, and the pros and cons of each? 
5. What can residents interested in administration do to position themselves for a medical director position or other leadership position in Emergency Medicine?
6. As a Department Chair, what do you look for in a new hire?
7. Is there any other advice that you'd like to offer to our resident and student listeners?

Nate Kuppermann, MD, MPH, Professor of Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics, Chair, Emergency Medicine, University of California, Davis School of Medicine


Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you’ll learn from Dr. Nate Kuppermann:

1. You are the principal investigator for PECARN and the Chair of the Executive Committee of PERN. These are the two largest research networks in Pediatric EM. How did you get involved in these huge research projects? How could a resident or student follow in your footsteps?
2. What do you think is the biggest barrier to developing a research project? What about the biggest challenge to sustaining one?
3. What is the best advice you can offer to a resident trying to start a research career?
4. What are some of the major trends and advancements we can look forward to in the field of Pediatric EM?
5. If you could offer one piece of advice to a prospective PEM physician what would it be?
6. Is there anything else you would like to tell our resident and student listeners about EM Research or Pediatric EM?