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Ask-a-Chair Podcasts

All RAMS Ask-a-Chair podcasts may be found below. Please note they are also available on iTunes

 

Chris Miller, MD, Current Chairman of University Hospitals affiliated with Case Western Medical Center


Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you'll learn from Dr. Chris Miller:

1. You have moved around a lot in your career.  From military to Cincinnati to Virginia, back to Cincinnati and now Cleveland.  What helped you know that picking up and moving was the right thing to do? Were your moves all based on opportunities offered to you or opportunities you made for yourself or both?
2. You transitioned from medical director to chair.  What is the biggest difference you see between these two jobs?
3. In a busy urban ED how do you balance education and the need to continue to see patients and move them through the department?
4. What can residents interested in admin do to position themselves for a medical director position or other leadership position in emergency medicine?
5. What are the pros and cons of an administration fellowship?

Lewis S. Nelson, MD, Professor of Emergency Medicine, Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, Chief of Service, Emergency Department, University Hospital, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School


Moderated by: Andrew Starnes, MD, MPH, EM Resident at Wake Forest School of Medicine


What you'll learn from Dr. Lewis S. Nelson:

1. You are one of several other chairs with dual board certification in toxicology. How do you feel this fellowship has furthered your career and ultimately position as chair? How has your focus on the opioid crisis changed how you practice or manage your staff?
2. What do you look for in a new faculty hire?
3. What advice do you have for medical students and residents looking to ultimately have a career in emergency medicine administration?
4. How has it benefited you to stay in the same relative geographic location for your training?
5. What are the biggest changes you see coming for emergency medicine and medicine in general?

Robert L. Levine, MD, Professor and Founding Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University 



Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine


What you'll learn from Dr. Robert L. Levine:

1. You’re considered one of the founding fathers of EM Critical Care and an authority on EM Critical Care Management. How did you do it? What's the secret to your success?
2. What inspired you to pursue Critical Care? Did you always know that you wanted to do it, or was there a particular situation that altered the course of your career?
3. Emergency Medicine Critical Care is still a relatively new specialty. What do you feel are some of its biggest challenges and barriers to entry?
4. What is your best advice for a medical student or resident who wants to pursue EM Critical Care?
5. Was there anything that surprised you about EM Critical Care that you didn’t know going in?
6. As a Department Chair, what do you look for in a new hire?
7. Is there any other advice you would like to give our resident and student listeners?

Neils K. Rathlev, MD, FACEP, Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School-Baystate


Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine


What you'll learn from Dr. Neils K. Rathlev:

1. Could you describe how you first become a Department Chair? Was it a lifelong dream, or something that happened by accident?
2. What were some of the major stepping stones in your path to becoming a leader in EM?
3. What were some of the most difficult decisions you had to make in your career?
4. What is your best advice for a medical student or resident who wants to pursue a career in administration and succeed?
5. As an operations expert, what are your thoughts on the tension between optimizing ED throughput and carving out time for resident education at academic institutions? How do you balance taking the time to teach at the bedside, and picking up the next patient as quickly as possible to optimize metrics like “Door-to-Doc” time?
6. Is there any other advice you would like to give our resident and student listeners?

Robert McNamara, MD, FAAEM, Professor and Chair of Emergency Medicine, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University



Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you'll learn from Dr. Robert McNamara:

1. What is the single biggest change that you have seen in the field of Emergency Medicine over the course of your career?
2. Where do you think medical education in EM is headed? What should residents and students be most excited about? What should we be most anxious about?
3. What do you think is the biggest challenge in delivering Emergency Medicine care today?
4. You’ve been very involved at both the institutional level at Temple and the national level with AAEM and other professional organizations. What advice do you have for residents and medical students trying to break out on the national scene?
5. From David Chu (MS3 Medical Student from Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine): What can we do to extend our careers as EM physicians and delay burnout/early retirement age?
6. Is there any other leadership advice that you’d like to offer our listeners?

Richard E. Wolfe, MD, Chair of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you'll learn from Dr. Richard E. Wolfe:

1. What is the single biggest change that you have seen in the field of Emergency Medicine over the course of your career? 
2. What educational challenges do you foresee in Emergency Medicine and the “House of Medicine” in general? 
3. (From Shana Zucker, MS2 Medical Student from Tulane University School of Medicine): If a resident or student wants to succeed in EM research, what qualities should they look for in their training program? What sort of institutional support do you think is necessary for successful research and mentorship for trainees? 
4. As a Department Chair, what qualities do you look for when hiring teaching versus research faculty? Do you always look for the “triple threat” who can do everything, or do you feel it’s important to focus on a particular niche? 
5. Is there any other advice you would like to give our resident and student listeners?

David Brown, MD, Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital


Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine


What you'll learn from Dr. David Brown:

1. What do you think is the greatest challenge in delivering Emergency Medicine care today?
2. You oversee an impressive array of services across different practice settings. It seems that many academic institutions are moving towards a systems model, where different hospitals and clinics are integrated and linked under one system. How does this impact medical education? Should residents expect to train in many different settings? Should we be taught how to navigate these networks?
3. What are your thoughts on physician performance metrics and pay-for-performance models? Is this something residents should watch out for when they look for jobs?
4. The many different paths into an administrative career can be confusing and difficult to navigate. Residents could pursue an administrative fellowship, earn an additional degree such as an MBA, or simply get on-the-job administrative experience. Could you describe your perspective on this, and the pros and cons of each? 
5. What can residents interested in administration do to position themselves for a medical director position or other leadership position in Emergency Medicine?
6. As a Department Chair, what do you look for in a new hire?
7. Is there any other advice that you'd like to offer to our resident and student listeners?

Nate Kuppermann, MD, MPH, Professor of Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics, Chair, Emergency Medicine, University of California, Davis School of Medicine


Moderated by: Amanda Ventura, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

What you’ll learn from Dr. Nate Kuppermann:

1. You are the principal investigator for PECARN and the Chair of the Executive Committee of PERN. These are the two largest research networks in Pediatric EM. How did you get involved in these huge research projects? How could a resident or student follow in your footsteps?
2. What do you think is the biggest barrier to developing a research project? What about the biggest challenge to sustaining one?
3. What is the best advice you can offer to a resident trying to start a research career?
4. What are some of the major trends and advancements we can look forward to in the field of Pediatric EM?
5. If you could offer one piece of advice to a prospective PEM physician what would it be?
6. Is there anything else you would like to tell our resident and student listeners about EM Research or Pediatric EM?