Advising Applicants for the 2020-2021 ERAS Application Cycle Webinar Hosted by RAMS

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented application season this year for emergency medicine-bound applicants with novel constraints from previous application years. Please join us for a moderated question and answer discussion with a panel composed of two clerkship directors and two assistant residency program directors from Wake Forest University and The Ohio State University. We will be discussing many of the current ongoing topics of concern, including canceled away rotations, SLOEs, non-SLOE letters of recommendation, how to strengthen your application, and more.

Opportunities for individual questions directed to our panelists will be available at the end of the session. We hope you will join us for this great opportunity to receive up-to-date guidance regarding the 2020-2021 ERAS application season.

Authors
  • Nicholas Hartman

    Associate Professor, Associate Program Director

    Wake Forest Department of Emergency Medicine

  • David Story, MD

    Assistant Professor

    Wake Forest University - Baptist Medical Center

  • Simiao Li-Sauerwine, MD

    Assistant Residency Program Director, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine

    The Ohio State University Medical Center

  • Christopher San Miguel, MD

    Emergency Medicine Clerkship Director, Assistant Professor – Clinical Institution: The Ohio State University

    Christopher San Miguel is the 4th Year EM Clerkship Director at The Ohio State University. Originally from North Carolina, he attended North Carolina State University as a Park Scholar and completed medical school at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. He completed his Emergency Medicine residency training at The Ohio State University where he served as Chief Resident. Before joining the faculty, he also completed a fellowship in Medical Education. His professional interests include curriculum development and innovation, simulation, and cognitive errors in medical decision making.